Blog

TV: Death or Diversification?

14 January 2014 | Blog

Mike Bloxham has a great article on MediaPost (“TV-Not Dying. Diversifying”) about how the sheer interconnectedness of the TV ecosystem prevents the so-called “death of TV”.

The important thing to remember is that TV — just like everything else — exists in a kind of ecosystem that includes not only the obvious cast of characters, like the broadcast and cable networks and their various offerings, but also the OTT players, many online businesses, consumer electronics manufacturers, advertising agencies, brands, retailers, production companies and the businesses that support them, etc.

There’s a very real interdependence that ensures all these parties and others survive and thrive in relation to each other.

He continues on, making the excellent point

To assume that these huge, well-resourced companies staffed by smart people are simply going to go away is naïve in the extreme.

Too many of the articles that pop up predicting the end of our largest and most influential medium seem to assume that while the digital world is quickly moving, the world of TV is completely static. Yes, TV is a big ship that turns slowly, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t some very smart and hard-working people at the helm. The fact is, TV will survive because we like TV.  Content creators like both the format of the medium and the ability for their content to reach millions of people easily. Advertisers like that same reach, too. Too many big companies are invested in the medium as a whole to stand by and let it wither. And perhaps most importantly, we like TV on a personal level. As a country, we watch more TV than ever. Not only is cord-cutting wildly over-reported, by some counts, it’s actually decelerating. Will the TV of the future look like the TV of the past? Of course not. But TV has changed enormously over the course of its lifespan so far; of course it will continue to evolve. But the fundamental existence of TV as a creative medium and advertising platform is in no danger. TV will continue to grow–and thrive–because all those “well-resourced companies staffed by smart people” are working very hard to make sure that’s exactly what happens.